Prayer

Training Wheels for Your Child’s Prayer Life

Training Wheels for Your Child's Prayer Life

(Today I’m excited to share this guest post from author and Church History professor Gary Neal Hansen. These are great insights into helping our kids develop a deeper prayer life!) Maybe you think intimate conversation with God is the most natural thing in the world. If you do, you’re right: we really were created for this. But all relationships, even with people, take skills. Kids have to grow in the skills of prayer. You wouldn’t just set your three-year-old on a bike and give her Read More…

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What Reputation Does God Have in Your Home?

What Reputation Does God Have in Your Home?

I knew the night was coming that I would have to tell the kids. I dreaded it deeply. My cousin Kim had died. She was in her early 40s and had metastatic breast cancer. She left behind a loving husband and two children. We had been praying for her every night for months. As we followed her journey through her husband’s online journal, we celebrated high highs and low lows. At many points, it seemed she would be victorious. We praised the Lord. At other points, the very improvements Read More…

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7 Faith Considerations When Raising Introverted Kids

A couple of weeks ago, we took our twins to a birthday party at a bounce house. It was the first one we’ve been to for a friend at school, and it was interesting to see how our kids interacted with the other kids in their class. After a while I didn’t see Nathan, so I went searching. I found him sitting alone inside a tunnel in the corner of the room. “Buddy! What are you doing in here?!” “I’m tired. I wanted to get away.” I didn’t even know what to say. My 4-year-old son was tired of Read More…

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How Does Prayer Work?

A few nights ago, we finished our prayer time and Kenna and Alexa ran off to their beds. Nathan, however, remained seated where our prayer circle had been. He had the look on his little face that means he’s lost in thought. “What’s up, buddy?” I asked him. “Mommy, God doesn’t always heal. Sometimes it’s medicine, right?” One of the things we had just prayed about was that Nathan would get well quickly from his cough. Earlier in the day, I had given him some medicine. I was Read More…

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Why We Pray in Restaurants

It wasn’t too long ago that I was mortified to pray in a restaurant (or any other public setting). One day a couple of years ago, Bryan and I met a Christian friend for lunch. We went to my favorite restaurant, and when the food arrived, I could hardly wait to sink my teeth into my chicken enchiladas. As I gleefully placed the first morsel of enchilada goodness in my mouth, our friend asked if he could say grace. Mortified. Mortified that I looked like a fake Christian for not even pausing Read More…

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60 Faith Questions I Hope To Answer Before My Kids Leave Home

In my recent post about starting faith conversations with kids, I pointed out that it’s one thing to acknowledge we need to be intentional in fostering the deeper conversations of faith; it’s another thing to have a plan for what those conversations should be. I said that I would draft a bucket list of conversations I want to have with my kids before they leave home someday and share them in a post. Here they are! A few notes on this list: 1)      These are questions that I feel are Read More…

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Teachable Moment: Prayer is a Privilege

I recently implemented a behavior reward system for my 3-year-old twins, and they absolutely love it. They get a star to put on a chart when they obey the first time I ask for something, when they do helpful things without being asked, and when they are especially kind to one another. When, between the two of them, they have filled in the chart with all 50 stars, everyone gets to go out for ice cream. There is an important catch here: they don’t get a star EVERY time they do one of these things. Read More…

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How to Start Writing Family Spiritual Goals: One Example

I’ve been thinking a lot about the key findings from the Revolutionary Parenting book I outlined in my last post. There is so much to take away from Barna’s findings, but what convicted me to most immediate action was this one: “Another of the distinctive qualities of Revolutionary Parents was that they set tangible and measurable parenting goals and held themselves accountable. Three out of every four of these parents (73 percent) developed and pursued goals. That’s about fifteen times Read More…

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